Link to MNC

Frequently Asked Questions for Parents and Care Givers

SUN AWARE Certification Program

What does SUN AWARE Certified mean?

SUN AWARE Certified is a designation that is awarded to camps which meet specific criteria and provide a sun safe environment for campers.

What does a camp do to become SUN AWARE Certified?

Here is a summary of what participating camps need to do to become SUN AWARE Certified.

  1. Identify and share current sun safety practices.
  2. Set goals and create a plan of action to refine and enhance the camp’s sun safety practices.
  3. Ensure all staff completes online training.
  4. Practice and reinforce the following sun safe behaviours with all campers:
    • apply broad-spectrum sunscreen frequently—especially when sweating or in and out of water
    • cover up with hats, t-shirts, wraps etc.
    • seek shade and avoid the sun when possible between 11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.
    • wear sunglasses
  5. Share information with staff, campers and their parents and/or guardians about the SUN AWARE Camp Program.
  6. Offer sun safe activities to campers during camp.
  7. Submit sun safety achievements at the end of the camp season!

How can I tell if a camp is a SUN AWARE Certified pilot participant?

""Camps participating in the SUN AWARE Camp Program pilot may choose to place a We Practice Sun Safety logo on their website.

A list of SUN AWARE Certified camps can be found here.

When the camp is certified they will receive a SUN AWARE Certification logo.

How can my child’s favourite camp become SUN AWARE Certified?

Please direct your child’s camp to our website, where they can find all the information they need to become certified.

Why should I send my child to a SUN AWARE Camp?

The SUN AWARE Camp Program seeks to raise awareness about the hazards of ultraviolet (UV) rays, how to protect your skin in the sun, and ultimately to reduce the risk of skin cancer and melanoma. The SUN AWARE Camp Program sets an important standard of sun safety. SUN AWARE camps are committed to preventing the development of skin cancer and melanoma.

Sun Safety

Why do I need to think about sun protection?

Melanoma is a very serious form of skin cancer and is one of the fastest growing cancers worldwide. Over 81,000 skin cancers were diagnosed in Canada in 2014. More than 6000 of these diagnoses were melanoma. Sadly, 1,027 died of the disease. Young people are especially at risk. Melanoma skin cancer is one of the most common types of cancer for youth between the ages of 15–29, and is one of the most preventable. Only one blistering sunburn can double a person’s chances of developing melanoma.

What should I know about exposure and time in the sun?

  • When outside and the Ultraviolet (UV) Index is 3 or higher, there is risk of harm to unprotected skin and eyes.
  • The UV Index regularly reaches 3 and higher between the peak hours of 11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. (daylight savings time [DST]; 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. standard time), from March to October on sunny and cloudy days.
  • The UV Index regularly reaches 5 and higher between 11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. (DST) from May to August, but rarely exceeds 10 in Canada.
  • Infants, young children and people with fair skin that burns easily are especially vulnerable to UV exposure.

What can I do to help my child be safe in the sun? What are sun safe behaviours?

There are 5 easy things you can do to help keep your child be safe in the sun. They are:

  1. Avoid the sun between the hours of 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. If you must be in the sun, seek shade.
  2. Wear a broad-brimmed hat.
  3. Wear 100% UVA and UVB protective sunglasses.
  4. Cover up with sun-protective clothing that covers as much of your body as possible.
  5. Apply broad-spectrum sunscreen of at least SPF 30.

How do I detect Melanoma?

It is important to know what to look for and to check your skin regularly! Learn more about what to look for.

How can I get involved in the SUN AWARE Camp Program?

We’d love to have your help! Please contact Chelsea at info@screenme.ca or 905.901.5121 ext. 104 if you would like to volunteer and get involved.

As a family we do many activities in the sun. Now that I understand the dangers of UV, do we need to stop spending time in the sun?

No, you do not need to stop spending time in the sun. We encourage all Canadians to enjoy the outdoors but to be sun safe and SUN AWARE. Here are the things you can do to protect yourself and your family:

  1. Avoid the sun between the hours of 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. If you must be in the sun, seek shade.
  2. Wear a broad-brimmed hat.
  3. Wear 100% UVA and UVB protective sunglasses.
  4. Cover up with sun-protective clothing that covers as much of your body as possible.
  5. Apply broad-spectrum sunscreen of at least SPF 30.

I know we get necessary vitamin D from sun exposure. Doesn’t this mean my children should be spending time in the sun?

There are safer ways to maintain healthy vitamin D levels than through ultraviolet (UV) exposure. You can achieve the target levels of vitamin D through your diet and by taking a supplement. The following sources are recommended sources of vitamin D: fatty fish, fish liver oil and egg yolk. Milk and margarine, soy milk, some fruit juices, cereals, yogurts and cheeses are also sources of vitamin D.

Melanoma Network of Canada

Who is Melanoma Network of Canada?

Melanoma Network of Canada is a national organization that provides melanoma patients and their caregivers with current and accurate information and services in the fight against melanoma. Melanoma Network of Canada also provides funding support for public awareness, education and research. Learn more about Melanoma Network of Canada.

I’d like to donate to the Melanoma Network of Canada. How do I do this?

You can donate here.

Our goal is to expand this program so more Canadian children and teens grow up without melanoma or skin cancer affecting their lives. Your donations will help ensure the future of this vital program.

I’d like to volunteer with Melanoma Network Canada. How can I do this?

Help Melanoma Network of Canada make a difference! Melanoma Network of Canada offers a wide variety of volunteer positions for people looking to make a difference in the lives of those affected by melanoma. Please visit us online at: http://www.melanomanetwork.ca/volunteer/.

Can’t find the answer to your question? Contact us.